Tuesday marked a busy day in Australia with regards to cryptocurrency and blockchain technology, as not one, but two breakthrough events took place. The first milestone came courtesy of RMIT university, who became the first Australian tertiary educator to launch a course based on blockchain technology – entitled ‘Developing Blockchain Strategy’. This news came on the same day as BTC Markets, an Australian cryptocurrency exchange, became the nation’s first fully certified crypto asset exchange.

Starting with the Melbourne-based RMIT university, the launch of their eight-week short course on blockchain technology comes a month before its commencement on March 19. The co-ordinators anticipate that its completion will require a total of 50 hours study. In an effort to involve as many disciplinary backgrounds as possible, students needn’t possess any prerequisite knowledge to be eligible for the innovative course.

The RMIT Blockchain Innovation Hub partnered with blockchain industry notables such as Accenture (professional services) and Stone and Chalk (fintech hub) to design the hands-on program. By doing so, RMIT believes that students “won’t just get a theoretical understanding of blockchain,” but through working alongside industry leaders, they will “learn how to use it.”

Melbourne is also home to BTC Markets; the basis for Tuesday’s second crypto-related breakthrough out of Australia. Indeed, the well-established exchange was issued a prestigious accreditation from the Australian Digital Commerce Association (ADCA); the industry body that represents commercial entities who participate in the digital economy via blockchain technology.

BTC Markets had already been an industry member of ADCA for several years, but has now acquired gold certification from the association. The distinction is far from a token title change, with BTC Markets explaining how it “is a significant leap from purely being a member,” as far as credibility goes.

Indeed, en route to become the first fully certified Australian crypto asset exchange, BTC Markets had to pass an audit by an independent third party to assess whether their business practices aligned with ADCA’s very own Australian Digital Currency Industry Code of Conduct.

This was by no means a once-off initiation procedure. If BTC Markets wishes to retain their prestigious accreditation, they are expected to adhere to these stringent requirements in perpetuity. To ensure compliance, the exchange will have to self-certify each year in addition to receiving a bi-annual audit.

Australia is by no means averse to blockchain technology. Just last month, Brisbane airport became the world’s first cryptocurrency-friendly airport. Whilst in December, the pioneering Australian bourse was the first stock exchange to switch to recording changes in shareholding with blockchain’s distributed ledger technology.

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